(Photo provided by Unsplash)

(Photo provided by Unsplash)

Teaching Philosophy

I tend to follow the progressivism teaching style. It encompasses the work of John Dewey and is centered around problem solving and investigative practices directed by student interest. A common Progressive classroom focuses on small group work, ongoing projects, the use of technology, and student involvement in evaluation. Instead of rules, a general regard for the respect for others is practiced. As a facilitator of learning, teachers often walk freely among students in place of direct instruction. Learning comes from social interactions, sharing responsibilities, and making students well rounded citizens.

I enjoy this type of classroom flow, because I believe that it shows students real world applications of their learning. This method allows students to work together and engage in inquiry practices. As a teacher, I am able to ask questions to stimulate student learning and critical thinking. I use this in many cases as a substitution for direct instruction.

I noticed during my time as a student teacher, and as a substitute teacher, that today’s students struggle with communicating. More specifically, communicating during times of discussion and conflict. I continually support student’s social emotional growth by modeling, and practicing with students what safe and respectful conversations can look like. This gives them the vocabulary and phrasing they need to build healthy relationships.